Emotional Support for the Unemployed

This past Friday a recently laid-off Silicon Valley engineer fatally shot three former co-workers, including the CEO. This brutal incident of workplace violence was just one that makes up 20% of all violent crimes as reported by the San Jose Mercury News.

What does this workplace violence statistic say?

Violence is a product of anger and fear. While the motive of this particular killer remains unknown, the story suggests a couple of theories:

  1. Anger over the job loss
  2. Fear of financial insecurity
  3. Anger or fear over loss of identity without a job

Our nation is now grappling with the toughest unemployment rate in 14 years. The U.S. Labor Department reported that 1.2 million people have lost their jobs this year. With October producing 240,000, the total number is likely to surpass 1.5 million by the end of the year.

How can we support the emotions of the unemployed? Having lost a paycheck myself, I empathize with the fears about money and carving out the next gig. Yet a job transition can be viewed as an invitation to revisit what really matters at the end of each of our lives:

How well did you use your talents and expertise and develop your inner potential?

Give yourself permission to trust in the good of the universe. Look at losing your job as a message that:

  • Your talents and expertise are no longer needed at that company.
  • You are being freed so that you can contribute to a company that needs you more.

As a nation we can look at the vast number of jobs being lost as a message that:

  • We need to shift the focus of our work force to jobs that better contribute to what our country needs now.

Our new President is not responsible for initiating change. The unemployment situation demonstrates that change is happening now and we are all involved in the process. Unfortunately, change is often uncomfortable at first. Yet trust in the good of the universe and believe that you will arrive in a better place once you land.

What’s Your Vibe Saying?

I received a thank you card the other day from the program coordinator of a center for girls where I recently presented. In her note she expressed how she appreciated the vibe I brought to the girls. I thought that to be an interesting statement and considered what she specifically might have meant. I was conscious of the words I’d chosen to share, how I said them and what I wore. But my vibe?

Yesterday I attended a women’s networking event where I met a number of women for the first time. As I reflected on the event afterwards and brought to mind those I met, I realized that it wasn’t what they’d said or what they’d worn that stayed in my mind; it was their vibe.

Vibe as defined by The Free Dictionary: a distinctive emotional aura experienced instinctively

My mind kept revisiting one woman in particular. I knew very little about her life, but through her vibe, I sensed she felt beaten down, hungry for something that is missing in her life, and not comfortable in her own skin. While this person seems very nice on the outside, her vibe feels like a downer.

We all pick up on vibes, whether we are conscious of it or not.

Are you aware of what your vibe says?

Does it express what you want to attract in your life?

For tips on how to improve your vibe, read my article Raising Your Vibration to Attract What You Want.